NAFTA Portal

Overturning Citizens United

NAFTA Portal

Since NAFTA negotiations began in 1990, IATP has been a leading voice in criticizing how the agreement has subverted local democracy and benefited corporate agribusiness over farmers, consumers, and communities in all three countries. 

As NAFTA re-negotiation commences, we have assembled over 25 years of our research and analysis into this portal to serve as a resource for the Fair Trade movement to inform current advocacy and activism for a new NAFTA that works for people and the planet.

We've organized the portal so that blogs are below and documents to the right. We're trying to curate this in a way where the most interesting content is near the top, but if you're looking for a specific NAFTA topic, use the search bar. 

This portal is a work in progress, as we continue to rediscover material. It is very possible, especially with older online documents, that not all links work, but we haven't been able to test the tens of thousands of them that exist in the collection. Also, many of the old documents only existed in print before now. We have put PDFs online, but have yet to convert them to searchable text.

We'll continue to make improvements, as well as adding the new material we are generating on NAFTA as it is released. If you have feedback about the content, or additional information/documentation that you think is relevant to this portal, please send an email to Patti Landres, plandres@iatp.org

 

 

NAFTA Portal Blog

The third track: Trade that builds our economy anew

Sophia Murphy is an advisor to IATP, based in Vancouver, British Columbia. President Trump is playing high stakes poker in the NAFTA talks, with his US Trade Representative, Robert Lighthizer, at the helm. Laura Dawson, director of the Wilson Centre’s Canada Centre published an op-ed on 11 October in which she suggests there are two tracks to the NAFTA talks – one is moving ahead with the “easy consensus” (i.e. tracking new issues that gained prominence in the Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations), while the other, driven by Trump’s tweets and America First Agenda, is putting t

NAFTA and the challenge for water justice

What should a post-TPP U.S. trade and investment policy look like, if it is to protect not only workers, farmers, consumers and the environment in the U.S., but also in other countries? What can individuals and organizations committed to water justice do to make sure that the rights to water, food and health of rural and urban communities in North America are upheld? These issues will be very much on the agenda at the next round of NAFTA talks, starting October 11.

NAFTA 2.0: doing harm with ag biotech approval shortcuts

The NAFTA talks are advancing rapidly with very little information available to the public on their content or the possible consequences for fair and sustainable food and farm systems. This is the third in a series of blogs examining the proposals being made by agribusiness firms that take the failed Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) as a starting point.

Will Trump use NAFTA to institutionalize the wholesale delay and repeal of public protections?

The NAFTA talks are advancing rapidly with very little information available to the public on their content or the possible consequences for fair and sustainable food and farm systems. This is the first in a series of blogs examining the proposals being made by agribusiness firms that take the failed Trans Pacific Partnership as a starting point.

What’s at stake for farmers, food and the land in a new NAFTA

The re-negotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the U.S., Mexico and Canada begins tomorrow and there is much at stake for farmers and rural communities in all three countries. Despite promised gains for farmers, NAFTA’s benefits over the last 23 years have gone primarily to multinational agribusiness firms. NAFTA is about much more than trade.